Pluto’s Gate Uncovered in Turkey

A “gate to hell” has emerged from ruins in southwestern Turkey, Italian archaeologists have announced.
Known as Pluto’s Gate — Ploutonion in Greek, Plutonium in Latin — the cave was celebrated as the portal to the underworld in Greco-Roman mythology and tradition.
Historic sources located the site in the ancient Phrygian city of Hierapolis, now called Pamukkale, and described the opening as filled with lethal mephitic vapors.
“This space is full of a vapor so misty and dense that one can scarcely see the ground. Any animal that passes inside meets instant death,” the Greek geographer Strabo (64/63 BC — about 24 AD) wrote.
“I threw in sparrows and they immediately breathed their last and fell,” he added.
Announced this month at a conference on Italian archaeology in Istanbul, Turkey, the finding was made by a team led by Francesco D’Andria, professor of classic archaeology at the University of Salento.
D’Andria has conducted extensive archaeological research at the World Heritage Site of Hierapolis. Two years ago he claimed to discover there the tomb of Saint Philip, one of the 12 apostles of Jesus Christ.
Founded around 190 B.C. by Eumenes II, King of Pergamum (197 B.C.-159 B.C.), Hierapolis was given over to Rome in 133 B.C.

Read more.

Pluto’s Gate Uncovered in Turkey

A “gate to hell” has emerged from ruins in southwestern Turkey, Italian archaeologists have announced.

Known as Pluto’s Gate — Ploutonion in Greek, Plutonium in Latin — the cave was celebrated as the portal to the underworld in Greco-Roman mythology and tradition.

Historic sources located the site in the ancient Phrygian city of Hierapolis, now called Pamukkale, and described the opening as filled with lethal mephitic vapors.

“This space is full of a vapor so misty and dense that one can scarcely see the ground. Any animal that passes inside meets instant death,” the Greek geographer Strabo (64/63 BC — about 24 AD) wrote.

“I threw in sparrows and they immediately breathed their last and fell,” he added.

Announced this month at a conference on Italian archaeology in Istanbul, Turkey, the finding was made by a team led by Francesco D’Andria, professor of classic archaeology at the University of Salento.

D’Andria has conducted extensive archaeological research at the World Heritage Site of Hierapolis. Two years ago he claimed to discover there the tomb of Saint Philip, one of the 12 apostles of Jesus Christ.

Founded around 190 B.C. by Eumenes II, King of Pergamum (197 B.C.-159 B.C.), Hierapolis was given over to Rome in 133 B.C.

Read more.

  1. afr0-senpai reblogged this from tombrvider
  2. tombrvider reblogged this from archaeology
  3. spooninthesauce reblogged this from sickpage
  4. joecool reblogged this from moth-particle
  5. b0otysweat reblogged this from airloss
  6. lactose-intolerantbitch reblogged this from bcknsty
  7. bcknsty reblogged this from plutoh
  8. missleerae reblogged this from moth-particle
  9. iggynotjiggy reblogged this from airloss
  10. moth-particle reblogged this from airloss
  11. iggy-skulls reblogged this from plutoh
  12. face-melter reblogged this from airloss
  13. crashovalle reblogged this from plutoh
  14. online-virgin reblogged this from plutoh
  15. rrr-adical reblogged this from airloss
  16. plutoh reblogged this from airloss
  17. airloss reblogged this from royalblueturtleneck
  18. realhousewifeofancientrome reblogged this from archaeology
  19. 24hoursinaday reblogged this from loveleesanity
  20. thingswoolike2 reblogged this from hehasawifeyouknow
  21. thisisnotworthreading reblogged this from soopernifty
  22. soopernifty reblogged this from imjusttryingtotakeovertheworld
  23. amyrutherford reblogged this from wunderflumps
  24. breastfeeding-milhouse reblogged this from mazikeen
  25. themoocoup reblogged this from wunderflumps
  26. fishfingersncustardyo reblogged this from wunderflumps