Sadly, the University of York lacks a Classics department. This would have been a very easy mistake to catch.
brooklynmuseum
brooklynmuseum:

An Egyptian painted mummy shroud is undergoing an exciting conservation treatment. Over the next few months, Rita Berg will be discussing various stages along the way. Our last post focused on microscopic examination. Today’s post will address the identification of Egyptian blue using visual-induced luminescence (VIL).
Egyptian blue is one of the earliest known synthetic pigments, first produced around 2500 BC. Its brilliant color is often seen in decorative blue glazes of ancient Egyptian ceramics. The pigment was also used in wall paintings, panel paintings, and textile decoration. The unique luminescent properties of Egyptian blue in the near-infrared spectrum of light can be used to identify even the smallest traces of the pigment in works of art.
This technique is called visual-induced luminescence (VIL) and involves shining a bright LED light onto the surface of an artwork and taking a photograph using a camera that has had its filters altered to be sensitive to the near-infrared region of light waves (approximately 910 nanometers).  To the naked eye, the artwork appears normal, but the specially filtered camera captures the intensely bright emission produced by Egyptian blue in the near-infrared region.

Posted by Rita Berg

brooklynmuseum:

An Egyptian painted mummy shroud is undergoing an exciting conservation treatment. Over the next few months, Rita Berg will be discussing various stages along the way. Our last post focused on microscopic examination. Today’s post will address the identification of Egyptian blue using visual-induced luminescence (VIL).

Egyptian blue is one of the earliest known synthetic pigments, first produced around 2500 BC. Its brilliant color is often seen in decorative blue glazes of ancient Egyptian ceramics. The pigment was also used in wall paintings, panel paintings, and textile decoration. The unique luminescent properties of Egyptian blue in the near-infrared spectrum of light can be used to identify even the smallest traces of the pigment in works of art.

This technique is called visual-induced luminescence (VIL) and involves shining a bright LED light onto the surface of an artwork and taking a photograph using a camera that has had its filters altered to be sensitive to the near-infrared region of light waves (approximately 910 nanometers).  To the naked eye, the artwork appears normal, but the specially filtered camera captures the intensely bright emission produced by Egyptian blue in the near-infrared region.

Posted by Rita Berg

Could all the pharaohs read and write? Only 1-3 percent of the inhabitants of ancient Egypt mastered this exceptionally difficult art. Evidence of literacy of the rulers of Egypt are perhaps not numerous, but clear, argues Filip Taterka, Egyptologist, a doctoral student at the Institute of Prehistory, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań.

"The most famous Egyptian text that speaks of the royal literacy is the Prophecy of Neferti. It is a story concerning the first king of the fourth dynasty - Sneferu. In the story, the ruler writes down the words of Neferti - the wise man from the East- on papyrus. Although this story can not be treated as proof of literacy of Sneferu himself, since it was created a thousand years after his reign, it clearly shows that at least in the time of the 12th dynasty, the Egyptians could imagine such a situation" - believes Taterka.

Evidence of the Pharaohs literacy is - according to the Egyptologist - rich clerical equipment found by Howard Carter in the tomb of Tutankhamun in the Valley of the Kings, which according to the discoverer, bears traces of use, dating back to the period of education of the young king.

"Future pharaohs often held high administrative positions. Any function within the state administration in ancient Egypt was associated with the absolute necessity of knowledge of the letter. Without this, they would not be able to perform their duties" - said the Egyptologist.

More at the link.

At a public debate staged by King’s College London, Prof Luca Giuliani challenged the museum’s view that it dates from the 1st century AD.

The professor of classical archaeology at Humboldt University in Berlin dismissed it as a creation of the early 20th century, arguing that such explicit imagery is unprecedented in Roman silverware. He suggested instead that the cup was designed for the pleasure of its former owner – a wealthy American gay man, Edward Perry Warren, who bought it in Rome in 1911, and who also acquired other “counterfeit” pieces, he said

The Roman harbour city of Portus lay at the heart of an empire that extended from Scotland to Iraq. Established by Claudius and enlarged by the emperor Trajan with spoils of the Dacian wars, the port was the conduit for everything the city of Rome required from its Mediterranean provinces: the food and, particularly grain, that fed the largest urban population of the ancient world, as well as luxuries of all kinds, building materials, people and wild animals for the arena.

On this course you will chart a journey from the Imperial harbour to its connections across the Mediterranean, learning about what the archaeological discoveries uncovered by the Portus Project tell us about the history, landscape, buildings, and the people of this unique place. Although the site lies in ruins, it has some of the best-preserved Roman port buildings in the Mediterranean, and in this course you will learn to interpret these and the finds discovered within them, using primary research data and the virtual tools of the archaeologist.

Largely filmed on location at Portus, the course will provide you with an insight into the wide range of digital technologies employed to record, analyse and present the site. In addition to the lead educators, our enthusiastic team of student archaeologists will support your learning.
You can use the hashtag #UoSFLPortus to join and contribute to Twitter conversations about this course.

The 1,61 m.-wide, 0, 77 m.-high and 3 up to 9 cm.- thick sarcophagus, which was found almost intact, does not consist of different kinds of timber, as usual, but it is made of a single tree-trunk wich still keeps all its characteristics, including its skin and growth rings. It dates to the Archaic Period (610-490/480 π.Χ.), on the basis of the area it was located, the level of the deposit, as well as an Archaic osrtacon found next to the head of the young male deceased. Although research has not taken place yet, there is a preliminary idea suggesting that the wood’s use as a sarcophagus was secondary, having previously been used as a boat!

A number of research studies since the 1980s have indicated that the Greek island of Santorini’s volcano may have erupted not in the 16th century BC as traditionally thought but possibly in the century before that. If this dating had been confirmed, it would have involved rewriting the whole history of the cultural development of the eastern Mediterranean region. The latest evidence for antedating the eruption was supplied by a study from Denmark that used radiocarbon dating (14C dating) to examine olive wood from the period of the eruption.
However, an international team of researchers led by Paolo Cherubini from the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) has demonstrated in the scientific journal Antiquity that this method cannot provide reliable results. The scientists show that 14C dating of individual pieces of olive wood enveloped by volcanic ash is too unreliable for precise dating.