MU, Italian Museum, City of Rome, Energy Company Partner for Historical Cultural Project

For more than a century, hundreds of thousands of historical artifacts dating back to before the founding of Rome have been stored in crates in the Capitoline Museums of Rome, where they have remained mostly untouched. Now, the City of Rome; the Capitoline Museums, the first public museum in the world; and Enel Green Power North America, a leading renewable energy company; have started a project, known as “The Hidden Treasure of Rome,” which will bring those artifacts into the laboratories of U.S. universities to be studied, restored, categorized and catalogued. The University of Missouri is the first university selected for this project.

Under the agreement, both MU scholars and students will have access to the antiquities. Graduate students in MU’s Department of Art History and Archaeology will be working directly with the collections and can use these objects for thesis and dissertation projects. The first set of loans — 249 black-gloss ceramics dating to the period of the Roman Republic (fifth to first centuries B.C.) —recently were received by the MU Museum of Art and Archaeology.

archaeologicalnews

archaeologicalnews:

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More than 3,300 years ago, in a newly built city in Egypt, a woman with an incredibly elaborate hairstyle of lengthy hair extensions was laid to rest.

She was not mummified, her body simply being wrapped in a mat. When archaeologists uncovered her remains they found she wore “a very complex…

NB: If you want to see the famous Garden Room frescoes, you still have to go to the Palazzo Massimo in Rome.

Archaeologists have unearthed a stylus wax tablet at the site of a Roman fort on Hadrian’s Wall in Northumberland.

Believed to be from 105-120AD, the tablet was found just 12in (30cm) from a wooden toilet seat discovered at the same location last month.

The tablet is one of 12 found at Vindolanda this year and one of seven found from the same building level.

Director of excavations, Dr Andrew Birley, said he was “looking forward” to reading the tablet’s text.

The site, near Hexham, has previously revealed gold and silver coins and other artefacts of the Roman army.

Roman jewellery described as being of “national importance” has been discovered during excavations at an Essex department store.

Gold and silver armlets, bracelets, rings and coins were found buried in the remains of a Roman house beneath Williams and Griffin in Colchester.

It is thought they were hidden by their wealthy owner in AD61, when Boudicca’s British tribes burnt down the town.

Colchester Archaeological Trust said it was a “remarkable Roman collection”.

The jewellery was found during renovation work at the shop, which is part of the Fenwick group and currently undergoing a £30m redevelopment.